Assignment for May 4

April 20, 2011

RESEARCH:

Paper – Written results of research project:
at least three thousand (3,000) words of polished prose [at least five thousand (5,000) words of polished prose if enrolled for four hours credit], with citations and bibliography in an appropriate style, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for April 20

April 13, 2011

RESEARCH:

Presentation – Oral synopsis of research project:
eight to ten (8-10) minutes of extemporaneous comments summarizing your findings, supported by a one-page handout bearing your name and project title.

Group 3:  Brittany, Imran, Jeff, Kevin

Group 4:  Alex, Elyse, Garrett, Weijia

Assignment for April 13

April 6, 2011

RESEARCH:

Presentation – Oral synopsis of research project:
eight to ten (8-10) minutes of extemporaneous comments summarizing your findings, supported by a one-page handout bearing your name and project title.

Group 1:  Henry, Jessica, Jim, Joe

Group 2:  Blessing, Briana, Elena, Pat, Scot

Assignment for April 6

March 30, 2011

READINGS:

Read the following selections in Environmental Justice and Environmentalism;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Faber, “A More ‘Productive’ Environmental Justice Politics: Movement Alliances in Massachusetts for Clean Production and Regional Equity”

Roberts, “Globalizing Environmental Justice”

Patrick, “Biological Diversity in Ecology” (The Philosophy of Ecology)

RESEARCH:

Outline – Tentative organization of research paper:
at least one (1) full page specifying main points and subpoints, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for March 30

March 16, 2011

READINGS:

Read the following selections in The Ecocriticism Reader;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Slovic, “Nature Writing and Environmental Psychology: The Interiority of Outdoor Experience”

Evernden, “Beyond Ecology: Self, Place, and the Pathetic Fallacy”

Simberloff, “A Succession of Paradigms in Ecology: Essentialism to Materialism to Probabilism” (The Philosophy of Ecology)

Assignment for March 16

March 9, 2011

READINGS:

Read the following selections in The Ecocriticism Reader;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Campbell, “The Land and Language of Desire: Where Deep Ecology and Post-Structuralism Meet”

Le Guin, “The Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction”

Popper, “The Bucket and the Searchlight: Two Theories of Knowledge” (The Philosophy of Ecology)

RESEARCH:

Bibliography – Penultimate list of research sources:
at least ten (10) relevant books, articles, and websites you have studied, cited in an appropriate bibliographic style, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for March 9

March 2, 2011

READINGS:

Read the following selections in Out of the Woods;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Stewart, “Rice, Water, and Power: Landscapes of Domination and Resistance in the Lowcountry, 1790-1880”

Pyne, “Nataraja: India’s Cycle of Fire”

Collins, “Evolutionary Ecology and the Use of Natural Selection in Ecological Theory” (The Philosophy of Ecology)

Assignment for March 2

February 23, 2011

READINGS:

Read the following selections in Out of the Woods;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Simmons, “The Earliest Cultural Landscapes of England”

Gottlieb, “Reconstructing Environmentalism: Complex Movements, Diverse Roots”

Smilor, “Personal Boundaries in the Urban Environment: The Legal Attack on Noise, 1865-1930”

RESEARCH:

Proposal – Formal description of research topic:
at least three hundred (300) words detailing the focus, methodology, and significance of your project, accompanied by a working bibliography of relevant sources you have accessed, typed and double-spaced with an original and fitting title.

Assignment for February 23

February 16, 2011

RESEARCH:

Explore back issues of the following periodicals, looking for potential research topics;
come prepared to present at least two article-length pieces from two different periodicals:

Orion Magazine: nature / culture / place
(University Library)

Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology
(University Library)

Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture
(University Library)

Environmental History
(University Library)

ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment
(University Library)

Environmental Ethics
(University Library)

High Country News
(not in University Library!)

Assignment for February 16

February 9, 2011

READINGS:

Preview Environmental Justice and Environmentalism:
The Social Justice Challenge to the Environmental Movement
;
come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read acknowledgments, appendices

Read the following selections in Environmental Justice and Environmentalism;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Pezzullo and Sandler, “Introduction: Revisiting the Environmental Justice Challenge to Environmentalism”

DeLuca, “A Wilderness Environmentalism Manifesto: Contesting the Infinite Self-Absorption of Humans”

Wenz, “Does Environmentalism Promote Injustice for the Poor?”

Assignment for February 9

February 2, 2011

READINGS:

Preview The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology;
come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read preface, acknowledgments, recommended reading

Read the following selections in The Ecocriticism Reader;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Glotfelty, “Introduction: Literary Studies in an Age of Environmental Crisis”

White, “The Historical Roots of Our Environmental Crisis”

Manes, “Nature and Silence”

Assignment for February 2

January 26, 2011

READINGS:

Preview Out of the Woods: Essays in Environmental History;
come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read acknowledgments, introduction, section headnotes

Read the following selections in Out of the Woods;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

Merchant, “The Theoretical Structure of Ecological Revolutions”

Cronon, “The Trouble with Wilderness: Or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature”

MacCameron, “Environmental Change in Colonial New Mexico”

Assignment for January 26

January 19, 2011

READINGS:

Preview The Philosophy of Ecology: From Science to Synthesis;
come prepared to introduce the text:

skim cover, front matter, back matter

read preface, acknowledgments, afterword

Read the following selections in The Philosophy of Ecology;
come prepared to summarize each selection:

“Introduction: Ecology as a Science of Synthesis” (1-19)

“Part One. Entities and Process in Ecology” (21-33)

“Part Two. Community, Niche, Diversity, and Stability” (101-110)

“Part Three. Rationalism and Empiricism” (133-140)

“Part Four. Reductionism and Holism” (171-179)

“Part Five. Ecology and Evolution” (233-245)

Welcome to the course!

November 1, 2010

Our first class meeting is Wednesday, January 19, 6:00-8:30 p.m. at 1022 Foreign Languages Building (south side of the first floor).

Please enter your email address at the bottom of the page to receive course assignments and other important information.

See you in class!